Blog series: Explaining different working time models, PART 2

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Part 2: Flexitime, function time and lots more

While the first part of our blog series mainly focused on more traditional working time systems, the following post will take a closer look at more innovative approaches and combinations of the two models.

The flexitime scheme

Whereas traditional full-time models (https://www.sheepblue.com/en/blog-series-explaining-different-working-time-models/) offer employees only limited flexibility due to clearly defined working hours, flexitime offers an efficient solution. In this case, the working day consists of a fixed core working time together with flexitime phases in which attendance can be freely chosen. Flexitime working models are widely used, especially in office environments, and enable employees to actively arrange their work schedule. In a flexitime scheme, employees time is mainly tracked in monthly work time accounts. The option to spread their working hours over the entire month gives the employees the ability to tailor their working day to their individual needs.  By defining core working hours, employers ensure continuous operations while providing employees with the possibility of self-determination.

Working with function times

The usage of function times can be seen as a variation of the flexitime model. Here, the focus is on the performance of the corresponding functional unit or department. Thus, productive operations can be ensured. During the process, it is of utmost importance that areas of responsibility are clearly defined and that these are assigned to specific groups to ensure steady operations. Depending on the way in which functional areas are defined, this model offers an efficient solution for service provision as well as production activities.

Working with function times

The usage of function times can be seen as a variation of the flexitime model. Here, the focus is on the performance of the corresponding functional unit or department. Thus, productive operations can be ensured. During the process, it is of utmost importance that areas of responsibility are clearly defined and that these are assigned to specific groups to ensure steady operations. Depending on the way in which functional areas are defined, this model offers an efficient solution for service provision as well as production activities.

The honour based working time system

To ensure the highest possible degree of flexibility and autonomy for employees, companies may choose to implement a trust-based working time model. In this process, the monitoring of work performance is based on previously established targets. Compliance with contractually agreed working hours is thus the responsibility of the employee. By moving away from the original control mechanisms, this model appeals to employees’ personal sense of responsibility and the trust of their supervisors. Although this working time model ensures a significant level of flexibility for employees, trust-based working time is not suitable for all industries. Given the tremendous planning effort necessary and the subsequent lack of control, continuous operations cannot be guaranteed. As an example, this can lead to massive losses in the production sector. However, especially in creative jobs, employees in working from home or in jobs with working hours that are difficult to plan, this model can nevertheless be highly beneficial.

In the third part of our series, you will find out which working time models can be particularly useful in multi-shift operations!

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